To Help Employees Vote, Clients Pull the Lever on Child Care

Little girl holding up a sign that says "Future Voter"

Anyone who’s ever been a parent (or known one, or helped one…or had one) knows there are things you can’t do if you don’t have anyone to watch the kids. 

This year, that might have included voting. 

Except thanks to some enterprising employers, it won’t. 

From Fast Company’s Lydia Dishman

Although Election Day isn’t officially a federal holiday, many employers grant workers paid time off to cast their votes without worrying about missing a day of work. This year is trickier as the pandemic put the kibosh on standard operating procedures. While there’s been a surge in mail-in ballots and in-person polling places open early (in some states for the first time), a small but growing number of companies have instituted even more voter-friendly policies to accommodate employees with children.

Expedia Group, ViacomCBS, Airbnb, S&P, Cantor Fitzgerald, and others are partnering with Bright Horizons—a provider of child care and early education, back-up care, and workplace education services—to offer free child care to working parents so they can go vote. Employees at participating organizations can use Bright Horizons to find a child care provider to come to their home or a Bright Horizons child care center. Free child care is available when they choose to vote, either early or on November 3.

The world is a complicated place. And right now, we all do what we can. As our CEO put it, “As our work, home, and personal lives continue to intertwine, Americans need their workplaces to play an increasingly supportive role in helping them manage it all

“These employers are truly stepping up to allow their employees to make an important impact this election season.”

We are so proud to stand behind our clients.  

#VOTE

Written by: Lisa Oppenheimer

October 29, 2020

About the Author

Lisa Oppenheimer at Bright Horizons

As Director, Brand Storytelling at Bright Horizons, Lisa writes “from the trenches” about the real life challenges of people in today’s workplaces: from the tensions of being a working mother, to working with millennials in the digital age, and everything in between. With a career ranging from freelance to full-time, Lisa brings a diverse employment background to her perspective.